2012 Exhibit

Curated by: Denise Markonish, curator at MASS MoCA, North Adams


Curatorial Statement

The 4th annual Brick + Mortar International Video Art Festival will have a special focus on Canadian artists. Over the past 3 years, MASS MoCA curator Denise Markonish traveled across Canada, visiting about 400 artists in nearly every Province and Territory. The result of this research will be the exhibition Oh, Canada, the largest survey of Canadian art ever organized in the United States (on view from May 26, 2012 – April 2013). There are 62 artists in the MASS MoCA exhibition and many others that could not be included, making a collaboration with Brick + Mortar a perfect opportunity to bring additional Canadian artists' work into the framework of this research.

The curatorial goal of the 2012 edition of Brick + Mortar is to extend one of the conversations started in Oh, Canada so that viewers of both shows will see connective threads. At MASS MoCA, artists such as Amalie Atkins, Kent Monkman and the Cedar Tavern Singers explore the performative in their work – through video, music and the theatrical. For Brick + Mortar this idea will be taken one step further, inviting artists to participate who make video-based works that highlight ideas of performance. While at one time, performative video merely meant documentation of a live act, now artists are increasingly creating performance for video itself, from Diane Borsato's restaging of historic performances by Joseph Beuys, Marina Abramovic and Bonnie Sherk to Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay's karaoke style performances done using security surveillance cameras and Adad Hannah's exploration of history and the photographic. Other artists continue to use video as a primary means for capturing live events like Manon de Pauw's collaborations with dancers to Adrian Stimson and Lori Blondeau's wild west themed shows that reposition the history of Frist Nations Canadian history. Nineteen artists will be included in the festival, addressing, through a range of tactics, what it means to enact the video screen.

Additionally, for the first time, The Festival will extend beyond the projected image to include live performances by select artists. The end result will be an exhibition that activates on dual levels, by encompassing the city through the use of alternative venues for showing art and by engaging the audience through the presence of artists throughout the festival.

Exhibiting Artists

Dick Averns
Dick Averns, born in London, England in 1964, currently lives and works in Calgary. Averns teaches at the Alberta College of Art and Design. Early works featured the clandestine installation of advertisements on trains and subtle amendments to billboards. Projects in the public domain include a series of conceptual text based installations and performative interventions, including the performative alter ego Armchair Terrorist. Averns has published his writings "The Vanguard War Art of William MacDonnell" (Canadian Art) and "Official Acts and Unofficial Actions - War Art Today" (UAAC Conference). Prior to establishing a career in art, Averns worked in both private and public business administration, for financial institution Bankers Trust and The Royal London Hospital. After travelling extensively, Averns attended drawing classes at the Parsons School of Art and Design in Manhattan before returning to London to study at the City Literary Institute. He additionally studied at the Wimbledon School of Art and Cheltenham; he received and MFA from the University of British Columbia in 2003.

Ambivalence BLVD is an on-going exploration of psycho-geography, humour and performance ethnography layered into conflicted political and cultural territories. For the performance-based work Averns has visited public sites such as Parlaiment Square, Downing Street, Buckingham Palace, The US embassy and the National Gallery in the UK and in Canada, the prime minister's residence, the houses of parliament, the National Gallery, the US embassy and more. At each site Averns holds up a street sign reading "Ambivalence BLVD," a sly comment on territory and politics.

Web Site: www.averns.com
Dick Averns

Ambivalence BLVD
Anthea Black
Anthea Black is a Canadian artist, writer and cultural worker. Her work in print, textiles, performance and video focus on setting a stage for collaborative encounters and inserting intimate gestures into public spaces. She has exhibited at Neutral Ground, Regina, SK; SNAP Gallery, Edmonton, AB; Stride Gallery, TRUCK: Contemporary Art in Calgary, John Snow House, and Illingworth Kerr Gallery, all in Calgary, AB; Southern Alberta Art Gallery, Lethbridge, AB, La Centrale, Montréal, QC; Off Center Center and SOMArts, San Francisco, CA; the Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland, OR; and she has circulated collaborative print editions in cities across North America through her ongoing artist-curatorial project, Looking for love in all the wrong places. Her writings on contemporary art, craft, and performance appear in numerous publications, and her collaborative writing with Nicole Burisch is included in The Craft Reader and Extra/ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art.

Queer Survival Campout Snowcave is a performance video project that took place during a record-breaking snowfall in winter 2010-11. The video is set in a quinzhee, which is a traditional Athapaskan structure made from a big pile of snow that is hollowed out to make a cave for winter survival and shelter. Snow occupies an important place in the Northern imagination and ecology; it can be a benevolent, insulating and feminizing part of the landscape, a hysterical, cruel and blinding force of nature, or an early predictor of good farming conditions in spring. Here, snow, and all of its associations set the scene for a video where local artists were invited into the cave to campout, celebrate, eat, drink and performatively take shelter from the hostile forces of nature and culture that surround.

Web Site: antheablack.wordpress.com
Anthea Black

Queer Survival Campout Snowcave, 2011
Diane Borsato
Diane Borsato is a visual artist working in performance, intervention, video, installation, and photography. She has exhibited in galleries and museums across Canada and internationally including the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Vancouver Art Gallery, the National Museum of Fine Arts of Quebec, the Art Gallery of York University, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, and The Power Plant. Diane Borsato is currently Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studio at the University of Guelph, and lives in Toronto.

You Go to My Head (2009) features a woman as she attempts to sing the 1938 song "You Go to My Head" by J.Fred Coots and Haven Gillespie. The woman begins singing using her husband's breath, with him reciprocating in the next scene. While the song describes the experience of love to be like drunkenness, they increasingly struggle to remember the words, the camera, or produce a musical sound at all. Her partner's breath simultaneously supports her, and depletes her as the piece evolves, and vice versa, building tension through the challenges of using each others bodies, and amplifying the gestures of attentiveness, trust, and dependence.

Web Site: dianeborsato.net

Diane Borsato

You Go To My Head, 2009
Single-channel video, 9:49 mins
Manon de Pauw
Manon De Pauw is an artist based in Montreal who works in video art, installation, performance, and photography. She has held solo exhibitions at Cambridge Art Galleries (2010), SAAG (2010), Galerie de l'UQAM (2009), Optica (2007), Trinity Square Video (2007), Expressions (2005) and Dare-Dare (2003), amongst others. Her work has been shown in numerous events in Canada and abroad, such as the MACM Quebec Triennial 2008, Festival TransAmériques (2008), and the 8é Bienal de video y nuevs medios de Santago 2007 (Chili). It can be found in the collections of the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, and the Collection d'œvres d'art de l'UQAM. In 2010, she was guest curator at the MACM for the series Point of vue on the Collection. She has toured worldwide with Daniéle Desnoyers and her dance company Le carré des Lombes, as a collaborator and video-performer. She lives and works in Montreal and teaches in Concordia University's Photography department. In 2011, she was shortlisted for the Sobey Art Award

L'arena (2010) is a video diptych that plays on the flow and form, appearance and disappearance of a group of performers behind a translucent screen. Through their strange task, they reveal in real time the creation process of an image in constant motion.

Web Site: www.manondepauw.com
Manon de Pauw

L'arena, 2010
Adad Hannah
Adad Hannah was born in New York in 1971, spent his childhood in Israel and England, moving to Vancouver in the early 1980's. He lives and works between Montreal and Vancouver. He has exhibited at the Samsung LEEUM Museum (Seoul 2011), Prague Biennial 5 (2011), Museo de Bellas Artes (Santiago, Chile 2011), 5th International Video Art Biennial at the Israeli Centre for Digital Art (Holon 2011), Canadian Biennial at the National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa 2011), National Museum of Contemporary Art (Bucharest 2011), Australian Centre for Photography (Sydney 2010), Liverpool Biennial (2010), Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (2010), the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (currently on view), the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal (2008, 2009), Zendai MoMA, Shanghai (2009), In 2004 he won the Toronto Images Festival Installation/New Media Award, and the Bogdanka Poznanovic Award at Videomedeja 8. His work has been funded by the Canada Council for the Arts, the Conseil des Arts et des Lettres du Québec, the B.C Arts Council, the Vancouver Foundation/Contemporary Art Gallery, the Québec Delegations and Canadian Embassies in Madrid, Seoul, and New York. He has been longlisted three times for the Sobey Art Award.

In Performance/Audience/Remake (2008), Hannah re-stages American conceptual artist Dan Graham's Performance/Audience/Mirror (1975). For this seminal performance, Graham described his own actions and those of his audience as he stood between the crowd and a mirrored wall. Hannah reemphasizes this act of mirroring, taking an original performance, where performer and audience are both mirrored and documented, and restaging it. However, in Hannah's version there is no audio, instead he creates a series of scenes, video stand-ins in which both performer and audience are both silent and still.

Web Site: www.adadhannah.com
Adad Hannah

Performance/Audience/Remake, 2008
Hannah Jickling
Hannah Jickling is from the Canadian north and currently lives and works in Toronto. Her current project interests look at sport, outdoor recreation and education as models for performance, participation and feminist engagement. Together with Helen Reed, she is artist-in residence and visiting scholar at the Ontario Institue for Studies in Education, supported by The Pedagogical Impulse, a SSHRC-funded research project.

In recent years, Hannah has shown/presented at: Locust Projects (Miami), Transmission Gallery (Glasgow), the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture (Yukon), Dalhousie University Art Gallery (Halifax), YYZ Artists Outlet (Toronto), Dare-Dare (Montreal), the Or Gallery, Access Gallery, VIVO (Vancouver), apexart (New York), Portland Art Museum and the SFMOMA (San Francisco). She received her BFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (2003), and her MFA (Art and Social Practice), from Portland State University (2010).

Web Site: hannahjickling.com
Hannah Jickling

I'd Rather Be Snow Shoveling, 2003-10,
11:03 mins
Valerie Salez
Valerie Salez is a multi-disciplinary artist who cross pollinates performance with animation, sculpture, drawing, collage, social art practices, sound and ceremony. Salez imbues spaces with a potent sense of the sacred, the absurd, the abject, and the beautiful. Often relying on provisional materials, her work has be framed as arte povera, situationist, Neo Hoodoo and psychic art automatisim. Her work has been exhibited nationally at the Edmonton Art Gallery, McMicheal Canadian Art Collection (Ontario), Dalhousie University Art Gallery (Halifax), Saint Mary's Art Gallery (Halifax), Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver), OR Gallery (Vancouver), Yukon Arts Center (Whitehorse) and ODD Gallery (Dawson City) and numerous artist run centers. Residencies include Dare Dare (Montreal), Banff Center for Arts (Alberta), Klondike Institute Of Art and Culture (Yukon), Elsewhere Collaborative (North Carolina) among others. Valerie grew up and has lived most of her life in the Yukon and currently dwells in Victoria, BC. She obtained her BFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design in 2002.

Web Site: www.wooloo.org/artists/6814

I'd Rather Be Snow Shoveling (2003-10) is a collaborative series of site specific, performative snow shoveling experiments by Hannah Jickling and Valerie Salez. Site specific, sculptural and performance-based, snow shoveling served as a starting point for engagement, conversation, collaboration and intervention with the passer-by in a variety of social and geographical contexts. This body of work was developed across Canada including Dare Dare (Montreal), Klondike Institute for the Arts (Yukon) and presented in galleries and cultural festivals such as Nuit Blanche (Montreal), Endlessly Traversed Landscapes at the 2010 Vancouver Cultural Olympiad, Blackwood Gallery (Toronto), Dalhousie Art Gallery (Halifax), Or Gallery (Vancouver), and Paved Arts (Saskatoon).
Hannah Jickling

I'd Rather Be Snow Shoveling, 2003-10,
11:03 mins
Alison S. M. Kobayashi
Alison S. M. Kobayashi is a visual artist working in video, performance, installation and drawing. She was born and raised in Mississauga, ON and is currently working between Toronto and Brooklyn. Her interest in found narratives resulted in two video works, From Alex To Alex and Dan Carter. Finding a lost letter in the first case, and a discarded answering machine tape in the second, Kobayashi imagines identities for each person mentioned in the narrative and then performs all the roles herself. In 2006 she won the TSV Artistic Vision Award for Best Local Short Film at the Toronto Reel Asian Film Festival and in 2007 was awarded the Mississauga Arts Award for Best Emerging Artist. Her films have been shown in Canada, the U.S., Spain, the Netherlands and Hong Kong.

For Defense Mechanism (2012) Kobayashi invites us into her imagination through her one-woman show, combining consumer security surveillance technology with her ensemble of characters and a collection of tenderly-created narratives. The presentation resembles a box of Allsorts Licorice - colourful, nostalgic and difficult to predict. This performance was developed at a 2012 residency at Les Subsistances, Lyon France.

Web Site: www.asmk.ca
Alison Kobayashi

Defense Mechanism, 2012
Wednesday Lupypciw
Wednesday Lupypciw is from Calgary, Alberta, where she pursues a lo-fi video and performance art practice. To make money she is a part-time maid. She also maintains a concurrent practice in textiles — weaving, machine knitting, embroidery and crochet — but this is done mostly while procrastinating on other, larger projects. The performance art collective LIDS, or the Ladies Invitational Deadbeat Society, a loosely knit group of purposefully lazy womenfolk, is one of those projects, as well as RCMP, the fantastically genderqueer Radical Cooch Maximum Pussy club. She is a Fibre program graduate from the Alberta College of Art + Design, and has shown work in various artist-run spaces throughout Canada including TRUCK Gallery, Stride, Harbourfront, Nuit Blanche Toronto, and EMMEDIA. She has been an artist in residence at the Banff Centre, and has just finished stints in Blairmore, Alberta at the Gushul Studio Residency and the KIAC artist residency in Dawson City, Yukon.

ICKKFAXX 2010 is a short video about one woman's physical relationship with a fax machine. It is a cinematic take on how people often subconsciously perceive "performance art" as an especially gross or uncomfortable thing, even though daily life is full of gross and uncomfortable moments that become banal in their repetition. Bodies are full of fluids, they teem with bacteria and intermingle with environments and other bodies. Yet somehow on a great many days we leave our beds and lovers and put on clothing and pretend that it is okay to do business.

Web Site: wednesdaylupypciw.com
Wednesday Lupypciw

ICKKFAXX, 2010
Lynne Marsh
Lynne Marsh's practice is located at the intersection of performance, cinema and the status of the image. In particular, Marsh's work explores the cultural and social concerns that operate at the convergence of speculative fiction, choreography, and staged events. Her most recent works, shot respectively in a sports stadium, a TV studio and an abandoned amusement park investigate the inscription of individual bodies in architectural environments built for mass consumption. Her works present conceptual and visual experimentations that create a space for us to speculate on the present concept of the individual and its contemporary exertion of pressure as a political subject. Lynne Marsh currently lives and works between Berlin, London and Montréal. She received her MA form Goldsmiths in London and her BA from Concordia University in Montréal. She is senior lecturer at the University of Hertfordshire UK.

The Olympiastadion in Berlin is both setting and protagonist in Stadium. Using a combination of footage shot on location in the stadium, 3D animation created from the architects' model of the recent renovation, and composite footage of a performer, an uncanny dialogue is played out between architecture and the individual. Amplified by the symmetry and repetition of both space and gesture, Stadium builds a tension between the pedestrian movement of public space and physical ideals reminiscent of early Olympic callisthenic dances and design.

Web Site: www.lynnemarsh.net
Lynne Marsh

Stadium, 2008
Christof Migone
Christof Migone is an artist, curator and writer. His work and research delves into language, voice, bodies, performance, intimacy, complicity, endurance. He co-edited the book and CD Writing Aloud: The Sonics of Language (Los Angeles: Errant Bodies Press, 2001) and his writings have been published in numerous journals. He obtained an MFA from NSCAD and a PhD from the Department of Performance Studies at the Tisch School of the Arts of New York University. He has released seven solo audio cds on various labels. Curated events include: Double Site (1998), stuttermouthface (2002), Disquiet (2005), START (2007), STOP.(2008), and Should I Stay or Should I Go (Nuit Blanche 2010 - Zone C). He has performed at Beyond Music Sound Festival (Los Angeles), Resonance FM (London), Nouvelles Scénes (Dijon), On the Air (Innsbruck), Ménagerie de Verre (Paris), Experimental Intermedia (NYC), Méduse (Québec), Images Festival (Toronto), Send+Receive (Winnipeg), Victoriaville Festival, Théâtre La Chapelle, etc. He has exhibited at the Banff Center, Rotterdam Film Festival, Gallery 101, Art Lab, eyelevelgallery, Forest City Gallery, Mercer Union, CCS Bard, Optica. He lives in Toronto and is a Lecturer in the Department of Visual Studies at the University of Toronto Mississauga and the Director/Curator of the Blackwood Gallery.

Hit Maker (2012) is a series of performances in which participants are sought throughout the city and are asked to hit a surface with a microphone one hundred times. The sound of each person's actions is amplified. Each person chooses his/her own rhythm and intensity. Hit Maker is a surprise, a little moment of noise, a strange little gesture, a sonic capsule of labour, a marker of time at work or out in the city.
Christof Migone

Hit Maker, 2012
Nadia Myre
Nadia Myre lives and works in Quebec and is an Algonquin member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishnabeg. Her multi-disciplinary practice is inspired by participant involvement as well as recurring themes of identity, language, longing and loss. Myre is a graduate from Camosun College (1995), Emily Carr (1997), and Concordia University (M.F.A., 2002). Solo exhibitions include Meditations on Black Lake (gallery Art Mûr, Montreal), Nadia Myre: Symbology (Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa), Skin Tissue –as part of Hides: Skin as Material and Metaphor, (National Museum of American Indian, Manhattan), and Landscapes of Sorrow and Other New Work (gallery Art Mûr, Montreal). Her work was selected for the 2011 Montréal Biennale, and will be presented in the 2012 Sydney Biennial, and Changing Hands III at the Museum of Art and Design in Manhattan. Recent group exhibitions include Le temp du dessin (Ensemble Poirel, Nancy, France), Vantage Point: The Contemporary Native Art Collection (National Museum of American Indian, National Mall, Washington, DC), and Femmes Artistes, L'éclatement des frontières 1965-2000 (Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, QC).

Rethinking Anthem (2008) calls attention to a key phrase in the Canadian National Anthem – "home and native land." This is a much-contested phrase as it begs the question of "who's home and native land?" This Eurocentric phrase does not take into consideration the indigenous birthright to the land. Myre's video shows the artists hand drawing and erasing the phrase in an attempt to reclaim, and rethink the practices of Canadian colonization and land rights.

Web Site: www.nadiamyre.com
Nadia Myre

Rethinking Anthem, 2008
Jan Peacock
Jan Peacock lives and works in Halifax, Nova Scotia where she teaches Intermedia at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. She has exhibited widely throughout Canada, as well as in France, Netherlands, Germany, Turkey, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Turkey, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and the U.S. Her published texts include "presence" in Point and Shoot: Performance et photographie (eds. Michéle Thériault and France Choiniére, Montreal: Editions Dazibao, 2005), "Ready Access" in Public, No 25: Experimentalism (Toronto: Public Access, 2002), "Move This" and "4/14/99" (with Paula Levine) in LUX: A Decade of Artists' Film and Video, ed. Steve Reinke and Tom Taylor (Toronto: YYZ Books, 1998), "(In) Script" and "SIRENSONG" in By the Skin of Their Tongues: Artists' Video Scripts, ed. Nelson Henricks and Steve Reinke (Toronto: YYZ Books, 1996), and Corpus Loquendi (Body for Speaking): Body-Centred Video in Halifax 1972-1982 (Halifax: Dalhousie Art Gallery, 1994). Her work is found in collections including the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Ludwig Museum in Cologne. She is a recipient of the Bell Canada Award and the Canada Council Medal for her contribution to the field of video and in 2012 was awarded the Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts.

This walk, these steps (1995) is an architectural work placing projection into a specially designed spaced. In the video, blindfolded by a slowed view of strangers passing through a Paris garden, are the tightly framed faces of a male performer and a female performer. Using their tongues, the sightless performers push words printed on small slips of paper out of their mouths and onto a sheet of glass in front of them. The conversation deteriorates, and their fingers pinch, rake and pull words off the glass.

Web Site: janpeacock.net
Paul Lindale

This Walk, these steps, 1995
Mark Prier
Mark Prier's multimedia work deals with themes of wilderness, mapping, and survival. His work takes the vernacular of survival as its starting point for abstraction, teasing form from sources as diverse as lean-tos, hunting blinds, camping shelters, and farm maintenance. He has exhibited in Canada, Mexico, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Prier is a graduate of the Visual Studies program at the University of Toronto. As half of the electronica duo hellothisisalex, Prier has played the MUTEK Festival in Montreal, done commissions for CBC Radio, and taken part in the National Film Board of Canada's Minus 40 project. Prier lives in Hopeville, Ontario, Canada.

Survival Walk (2008) features two people in lab coats solemnly carried an improvised survival stretcher along local paths and trails. The lab coats had the threaded outline of a red cross, as though a large badge had been removed. This performance was presented in three locations: Corner Brook (July 11, 2008), Fogo (August 3, 2008), and St. John's (August 8, 2008), Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada.

Web Site: www.markprier.com
Mark Prier

Survival Walk, 2008
Jocelyne Prince
Jocelyne Prince grew up in St. Boniface, a large Francophone neighborhood in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. She studied at the University of Manitoba School of Art (1981-83) and Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (1983-85). In the 1990s Prince became interested in using glass when Espace Verre began offering classes in Montreal. She did her MFA in glass at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). She began teaching in the Glass Department at RISD immediately after graduating, and now also teaches in RISD's Digital Media Department. She was a visiting artist at the Toyama Institute of Glass Art in Toyama, Japan, in 2004; taught at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax in the summer of 2002; was an adjunct assistant professor of visual art at Brown University in 2001-02, and adjunct assistant professor in sculpture at the Maine College of Art the previous year. She has also taught at the Bild-Werk Academy in Frauenau, Germany, and the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, WA. Jocelyne Prince lives in Providence with her husband, artist Lucky Leone.

For Cherry Blossom Live Event, K-Arts, Seoul, Korea (2011), Prince plays with the performative and collaborative act of glass blowing while also emphasizing the fleeting qualities of nature. In the video, Prince, along with her assistants in Korea, create blown glass cherry blossoms to place on a constructed wood tree. Since the glass is not annealed the blossoms explode reinforcing the fragility of glass and flowers alike.
Jocelyne Prince

Cherry Blossom, 2011
Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay
Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay is a Montréal-born artist and diarist. His creative gestures contemplate the history of song, the rendering of love and emotion into language, and the resurrection of voices - sung, spoken or screamed - from the past, taking form through video, sound, print and textiles.

Nemerofsky Ramsay's work has exhibited in diverse contexts across Canada, Europe and East Asia and has won prizes at festivals in Germany, Poland and Portugal. His work is part of numerous private collections as well as the collection of the National Gallery of Canada.

Live to Tell (2005) uses the ubiquity of surveillance cameras as stand-ins for an audience. Here Nemerofsky Ramsay is the performer using the surveillance camera to capture his own choreographed rendition (both through dance and voice) of Madonna's 1986 ballad.

Web Site: nemerofsky.ca
Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay

Live to Tell, 2002
Jon Sasaki
Jon Sasaki utilizes primarily video, objects, performance, installation and interventions, producing work that mixes humor and pathos, usually with discomforting or gently antagonistic results. He is currently partway through a traveling solo exhibition entitled Good Intentions organized by the Doris McCarthy Gallery at the University of Toronto, in partnership with the Kenderdine Art Gallery (University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon), Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery, Southern Alberta Art Gallery (Lethbridge, AB), MacLaren Art Centre (Barrie, ON), Prairie Art Gallery (Grande Prairie, AB) and the Dunlop Art Gallery (Regina SK). He has participated in group exhibitions at VOX (Montreal), The Vancouver Art Gallery, the Owens Art Gallery (Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB), Simon Fraser University Gallery (Burnaby, BC), as well as the 2006 and 2008 editions of Toronto's Nuit Blanche. He holds a BFA from Mount Allison University, lives and works in Toronto and is represented by Jessica Bradley Art + Projects.

Sasaki's work borrows familiar strategies of Conceptual art to reach ends that are overtly, unabashedly emotional. Sasaki's videos take on often-Sisyphean narratives, absurdities that draw from conceptualism as well as slapstick. For instance, the artist holds an anvil over a balcony playing with the danger of dropping it; attempts to climb a free standing ladder, sets off fireworks in a Plexiglas museum display plinth etc. Throughout all his work, Sasaki counters humour and cynicism, futility and tragedy, and the heroic and the mundane.

Web Site: jonsasaki.com
Jon Sasaki

Adrian Stimson
Adrian Stimson is a member of the Siksika (Blackfoot) Nation in Southern Alberta. He received a BFA from the Alberta College of Art & Design, an MFA from the University of Saskatchewan. His work explores ideas of punishment, identity, and the re-signification of post-colonial history. Exhibitions include Face the Nation (2008), Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton; Putting the Wild Back into the West (2008), La Centrale, Montreal; Marisa Portolese: Adrian Stimson (2008), IPS Gallery, Montreal; Honouring Tradition: Re-framing Native Art (2008), Glenbow Museum, Calgary; and Tracing History: Presenting the Unpresentable (2008), Glenbow Museum, Calgary. Stimson has worked as an associate curator at the Mendel Art Gallery, and is currently a sessional instructor at the University of Saskatchewan. Curatorial projects include, Articulations (2007), Emotional Geographies (2007), The Easy Magic Machine: Barrett Russell (2007), LIVE/LIVE (2006), ArtsUp (2006), SNAG (2003) and An Aboriginal Affair (2002). In 2003 he was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and in 2005 the Alberta Centennial Medal for his work in human rights and diversity activism.

Buffalo Boy is Stimson's anti-colonial, gender-bending persona. A parody of Buffalo Bill, Stimson performs as a drag, vamped up version of the cult icon, playing off ideas of frontier spectacles of the early Wild West shows. Stimson performs as Buffalo Boy in places like Banff National Park and Calgary, both in Alberta. Stimson notes that, "Buffalo Boy is a trickster character. He's campy, ridiculous and absurd, but he is also a storyteller who exposes cultural and societal truths."

Web Site: www.canadianart.ca
Adrian Stimson

Buffalo Boy
Colette Urban
Colette Urban was born in Denver Colorado. After relocating to Canada, she received a BFA from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, and an MFA from the University of Victoria. She has taught at various Universities in Canada including the University of Western Ontario. Urban retired in 2007 and moved to Meadows, Newfoundland where she is currently engaged in developing the Full Tilt Creative Centre, a multi-disciplinary artist retreat and exhibition venue. Urban has performed and/or exhibited her works at: Harbourfront Gallery, Toronto; Urban Institute for Contemporary Art, Grand Rapids, Mich: Duende, Rotterdam,The Netherlands; Mount Saint Vincent Art Gallery, Halifax; Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga; Presentation House, Vancouver; Art Gallery of Windsor, Windsor; Mercer Union, Toronto; Eastern Edge, St. John's; La Centrale, Montreal; Norwich School of Art and Design, Norwich, England; Sala Uno, Rome, Itay; Sir Wilfred Grenfell Art Gallery, Corner Brook; MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina; Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; Banff Centre for the Arts, Banff; Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon; Alberta College of Art Gallery, Calgary; Niagara Artist's Company, St Catherines; Open Space, Victoria; Western Front, Vancouver.

Belvedere (2004) begins with Urban's interest in exploring the landscape, heritage and culture of Newfoundland, addressing how memory can reconstruct ideals and ideas of place. Filmed at the Bowmanville Zoo in Bowmanville, Ontario, Urban presents a video of the artist riding and elephant. Covering her face is a replica of Urban's home in Meadows, Newfoundland, and over her shoulders she wears a brocade ornamental cape, which partially covers the elephant. Here the elephant wears the landscape but also serves as a symbol of the exotic – a feeling experienced when exploring a new place.
Colette Urban

Belvedere, 2004
Johannes Zits
Johannes Zits works with and combines digital imaging, collage, photography and painting to focus on the body. His work intends to draw attention to both the conventional image-making process as well as the ways images from mass media are disseminated and consumed. He received his BFA from York University in 1984. He has shown both in Canada and abroad. Zits travels widely while pursuing his art research. His extended stays in various cities include Taipei, Paris, Amsterdam, Vienna, Shanghai, Manchester, Hamburg, Santiago, London and Berlin. In January 2008 he presented a major solo exhibition highlighting his many disciplines at the Centre DíArt Contemporain de Basse Normandie, Caen, France.

For his video works, Zits uses movement and interactions along with digital static to subvert the tropes that perpetuate the heroicized "Man-in-nature" construct. The natural environment interacts as a "body" and not a passive participant, prop or backdrop; nor is it venerated and fixed in the realm of the sublime. Zits' videos are both visceral and poetic, encompassing a range of emotions from alienation to respect and romanticized idealization.

Web Site: www.johanneszits.com
Johannes Zits

Snow Mounds, 2012